Understanding Social Media Platforms

Many businesses, particularly during financially difficult periods, opt to cut their marketing budget before cutting virtually anything else. This is a mistake, of course, since effective marketing is what draws income in the first place. No matter how effective the product or service which you provide is, it won’t have the expected impact if the target audience don’t get to hear about it, or aren’t convinced to invest in it.

As a marketing agency, we’ve witnessed companies making this mistake time and time again. All too often, the assumption is that the marketing effort can be handled from within the company, but this is to severely underestimate the degree of expertise involved in effective marketing and advertising. When it comes to handling aspects such as email marketing, ppc advertising or creating a custom mobile app, leaving an amateur in charge makes no more sense than asking an unqualified office worker to deal with plumbing in the company washroom.

In recent years, the drive toward taking marketing in-house has been driven by the rise and rise of social media. Since the basics of setting up and using the various social media sites which are available are relatively simple, business owners make the leap of assuming that assembling, mounting and keeping up an effective social media strategy will be equally straightforward.

The truth, however, is that each social media platform has its own characteristics and will work more effectively with different forms of marketing aimed at different sectors of the public. An understanding of these differences is imperative if you are to use social media as an effective marketing tool, and to illustrate the point we’d like to share a few of the most striking statistics regarding the different platforms that are available. Gathering, understanding and utilising statistics of this kind is part of the job we do, and it’s why we’re a marketing agency that can deliver effective results time after time:

Facebook

83% percent of parents with a child between the ages of 13 and 17 are friends with them on Facebook.

The average Facebook user has 155 friends. The average woman has 166, the average man 145.

32% of Facebook users say they regularly engage with brands.

Twitter

49% of Twitter users follow brands or companies, making them three times more likely to do so than Facebook users.

42% of Twitter users learn about products and services through the platform

41% comment on products and services via twitter

19% use the platform to access customer service support.

Instagram

68% percent of Instagram users regularly engage with brands.

Instagram users are 2.5 times more likely to click on ads than those using other platforms.

A 2015 user survey found that 60% percent of users discover new products on the platform.

Pinterest

Two-thirds of the Pins on the platform come from a business website.

Pinners are 45% more likely than those on other platforms to be introduced to new brands.

45% of mobile users access the site for inspiration while out shopping.

LinkedIn

Half of users say they’d be more likely to buy from a company they engage with on LinkedIn.

94% percent of B2B marketers use LinkedIn to share content.

LinkedIn drives more than 50% of all social traffic to B2B blogs and sites.

YouTube

64% of gamers downloaded a game after seeing an ad for it on YouTube.

Those viewers who complete a TrueView ad are 23 times more likely to visit a brand channel, share the brand video or watch more by the brand.

Statistics taken from: https://blog.hootsuite.com/social-media-statistics-for-social-media-managers/

 


Omni-channel Marketing

As a top advertising agency we pride ourselves on remaining completely up-to-date with the latest developments in marketing. Over recent years, this has meant fully realising the opportunities presented by the most up-to-date digital platforms. From something which now almost seems traditional, like email marketing, through to getting Google certified with adwords and utilising the latest cutting edge custom mobile app, we offer our clients the full range of tools via which to get their message across to the people who matter – the customers.

A large part of offering the best possible service involves remaining fully aware of the latest developments, and in terms of digital interaction that currently means advising our clients that there approach to marketing now has to embrace an omni channel perspective.

Until now, many companies, whether working with a marketing agency or not, have adopted a multi-channel approach to their marketing efforts. In simple terms, this means interacting with consumers and potential consumers via a number of different platforms, ranging from a website to a bricks and mortar retail location and taking in aspects such as emails, flyers, posters and even packaging. The days when on online presence could be regarded as an optional extra or even a luxury have long since passed, but the latest trend, driven by consumer demand above all else, is for all of these channels to work together seamlessly.

The modern consumer is used to being able to access digital content on a more or less constant basis, and via numerous different devices. Until now, the emphasis of the average marketing agency has been placed upon ensuring that the messages in question are equally accessible via devices such as smart-phones and tablets as well as the more traditional lap top or desk top PC. An omni-channel approach takes this one stage further, recognising that the modern consumer demands a unified service no matter how they opt to interact with a business, and providing this across all media.

This would mean, for example, that a consumer who begins searching a website on their smartphone whilst commuting to or from work would then be able to access the same site on their tablet at home that evening, and find that their details and the details of their earlier search had been transferred across the devices. The same will also be true if they then decide to make an online purchase on their laptop, or even if they visit the bricks and mortar store. In this last example, the shop assistant in the store will be equipped with a device such as tablet enabling them to access the consumers’ online profile.

Whilst only a handful of businesses – such as large corporations like Disney – have actually travelled very far in the direction of an omni-channel offering, the modern, digitally engaged consumer will soon begin to take the customer service levels involved for granted. This will mean companies accepting the fact that all parts of their organisation, including on and offline divisions, marketing and customer service, will have to work together and share information and resources to deliver the experience the modern consumer demands.