Omni-channel Marketing

As a top advertising agency we pride ourselves on remaining completely up-to-date with the latest developments in marketing. Over recent years, this has meant fully realising the opportunities presented by the most up-to-date digital platforms. From something which now almost seems traditional, like email marketing, through to getting Google certified with adwords and utilising the latest cutting edge custom mobile app, we offer our clients the full range of tools via which to get their message across to the people who matter – the customers.

A large part of offering the best possible service involves remaining fully aware of the latest developments, and in terms of digital interaction that currently means advising our clients that there approach to marketing now has to embrace an omni channel perspective.

Until now, many companies, whether working with a marketing agency or not, have adopted a multi-channel approach to their marketing efforts. In simple terms, this means interacting with consumers and potential consumers via a number of different platforms, ranging from a website to a bricks and mortar retail location and taking in aspects such as emails, flyers, posters and even packaging. The days when on online presence could be regarded as an optional extra or even a luxury have long since passed, but the latest trend, driven by consumer demand above all else, is for all of these channels to work together seamlessly.

The modern consumer is used to being able to access digital content on a more or less constant basis, and via numerous different devices. Until now, the emphasis of the average marketing agency has been placed upon ensuring that the messages in question are equally accessible via devices such as smart-phones and tablets as well as the more traditional lap top or desk top PC. An omni-channel approach takes this one stage further, recognising that the modern consumer demands a unified service no matter how they opt to interact with a business, and providing this across all media.

This would mean, for example, that a consumer who begins searching a website on their smartphone whilst commuting to or from work would then be able to access the same site on their tablet at home that evening, and find that their details and the details of their earlier search had been transferred across the devices. The same will also be true if they then decide to make an online purchase on their laptop, or even if they visit the bricks and mortar store. In this last example, the shop assistant in the store will be equipped with a device such as tablet enabling them to access the consumers’ online profile.

Whilst only a handful of businesses – such as large corporations like Disney – have actually travelled very far in the direction of an omni-channel offering, the modern, digitally engaged consumer will soon begin to take the customer service levels involved for granted. This will mean companies accepting the fact that all parts of their organisation, including on and offline divisions, marketing and customer service, will have to work together and share information and resources to deliver the experience the modern consumer demands.

 


Ad Blocker

Digital Media: The UK’s Ad Blocking Problem

Ad Blocking software is become increasingly popular, especially in the UK. Consumers have so much control over what content they see, so they are becoming frustrated with the state of banner and especially video advertising. Most users spend their time on the internet watching YouTube and other video sharing platforms. The Ads on videos are becoming longer by the day, leaving users upset. Enter Ad Block software.

 

Many UK  Digital Media Users Use Ad Block Software

 

In the recent “Future of Advertising” survey, conducted in the UK, the results found more than half of UK consumers are likely or very likely to use ad blocking software. Respondents say they feel there are too many ads, they aren’t relevant to them, or even some saying the ads were “creepy.” 95% of users also said they would consider using Ad Block software in the future. Looking at the results of this survey, it is clear that there is more pressure on Advertisers than ever to engage their target audience online.

 

This is more important in the UK online advertising world than probably anywhere else in the world right now. 30% of respondents said they are likely and 23% are very likely to use ad blocking software in the future. This is slightly higher than the global average of 21% who are very likely and 30% who are likely. In the UK, 95% of those surveyed said they would consider using ad blocking software in the future. The only country that came in higher was Sweden at 96%. This isn’t the only similarity between UK and Swedish users, though, as 69% of UK users and 71% of Swedish users said they would be put off by a brand after being forced to watch a pre-roll ad for a company before an online video. The global average is 62%. Similarly, both UK and Swedish users were most likely at 85% to put a video ad on mute. But, the most telling statistic is that 74% of UK consumers said they would like more control over video ads, while the global average is only 62%.

 

To help advertisers deal with the rise in ad blocking software, advertisers must use targeting and distribution strategies to cut through the clutter and deliver ads that beat the ad blockers and earn consumer attention. With all the tools at our disposal in this new digital media age, we as advertisers must use discretion with our advertising dollars. There is so much video content being pumped into users social media feeds, it’s no wonder why they feel overwhelmed.